Home | News    Wednesday 3 January 2018

Sudan’s foreign relations “based on joint interests”: minister

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President Recep Tayyip Erdogan (L) and President Omer al-Bashir, exchange cooperation agreement between the two countries in Khartoum on 24 Dec 2017 (SUNA Photo)
January 2, 2018 (KHARTOUM) - A senior diplomat at Sudan’s Foreign Ministry Tuesday said his country’s foreign policy isn’t based on engagement in regional or international axes but seeks to achieve common interests through joint cooperation.

In recent months, Sudan has made some moves that were seen as inconsistent and contradictory to what has been perceived as the country’s declared foreign policy.

State Foreign Minister Atta al-Manan Bakhit said Sudan’s foreign relation “is based on the joint interests not the policy of axes”.

He told the semi-official Sudan Media Center (SMC) that Khartoum pursues a balanced foreign policy that takes into consideration the interests of the country and meets aspirations of the Sudanese people.

Bakhit pointed out that Sudan seeks to continue its active role among the international community to achieve regional peace, saying relations with the neighbours has witnessed significant improvement.

He vowed that Sudan would continue to open up to the regional and international community in order to achieve political and economic integration in all fields.

Following the visit of the Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan to Khartoum last week, the Egyptian media and a Saudi newspaper slammed an alleged Sudanese - Turkish deal to build a military naval base on Sudan’s Red Sea coast island of Suakin.

They pointed that it aims to destabilise the government of President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi who removed from power the Islamist President Mohamed Morsi in July 2013.

Observers in Khartoum saw the media attack in the Egyptian media and Saudi newspaper as a coordinated campaign by the anti-Qatar alliance countries on the government of President al-Bashir.

Also, the U.S. Administration last October permanently lifted 20-year-old economic sanctions against Sudan citing positive actions on humanitarian access and counter-terrorism.

However, during his first visit to Russia since he came to power in 1989, President Omer al-Bashir last November asked President Vladimir Putin to support his country against American plans against Sudan accusing Washington of planning to divide the country into five states.

(ST)

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  • 2 January 22:29, by kek nguan yok

    Sudan president.

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  • 2 January 22:55, by Habibi

    Should be based on Sudans interest only. I don’t give a fuck if those charcoal negroes down in the republic of south shithole finish each other off or if those belly dancers up north run out of water.

    As long as we get our waters and the south pays its tarriffs, we good. Sudan should join Entebbe agreement with Ethiopia and cancel the imaginary 1959 agreement with Egypt. we still need the GCC

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    • 2 January 22:58, by Habibi

      and Russia will defend Sudan in the UN. It will also supply the Sudanese air force with modern jets su30/35 and anti aircraft missiles such as the S-300. In addition to the nuclear energy reactors...

      Turkey is a welcome partner, Israel should also be our friend as they lobbied to get sanctions removed from Sudan, bless them :)

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      • 3 January 09:31, by Khent

        Habibi

        Ethiopia is fast becoming the premier Nation in the East African region and this seems to be recognised by virtually all the States around it, and so Juba should expedite the recent Agreement it inked with Ethiopia to provide petroleum products via a road directly linking Ethiopia to South Sudan’s largest oilfields; Ethiopia imports $2.8 billion in refined petroleum products...

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        • 3 January 09:39, by Khent

          ..Just two [2] years of that is all that is required to build the alternative pipeline through Ethiopia and Djibouti. The days of snively must end and the death-deserving traitors in Juba must not squander this opportunity. Garang dies and these morons let people walk over all us as if they couldn’t be easily countered...

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          • 3 January 11:20, by Habibi

            The reason why Ethiopia is considered a lion in east africa is because it is surrounded by weak ass states like somalia , djibouti , sout sudan etc.... you here talking about a $2 billion pipeline while your entire national budget is a laughable $300 million LFMAO who are you trying to fool or threathen? not just that but most of your budget spent on war and your people are starving to death

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            • 3 January 11:24, by Habibi

              you been using the pipe song since 2011 but every year the state of your country is getting worse and worse o a point where Somalia has a bigger economy then your country. No company will build a pipeline in a country whcih is going through hin the nile, south sudan doesn’t even come into the picture lmao

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              • 3 January 11:42, by Khent

                Habibi

                If you actually read my posts you would know that I was referring to the refinery that Juba has apparently already secured funding for, and which Ethiopia wants access to via a road that it has offered to financed.

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                  • 3 January 11:47, by Habibi

                    oh so its a planned refinery? never mind, build as many as you want lmao

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                    • 3 January 11:48, by Habibi

                      but if you read my posts am talking about an alternative pipeline, not a refinery. refineries are easy to make

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                  • 3 January 11:51, by Khent

                    If the morons in Juba complete that refinery and meet Ethiopia’s $2.8 billion needs, it would be able to established an economically mutually beneficial relationship with Ethiopia. To categorise this as a "threat" is just bizzare because such an action would not hurt you and deprive you of what rightfully belongs to you...

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                    • 3 January 11:57, by Khent

                      ..Refineries are easy to make and with that completed, Juba should direct a portion of those funds into building an alternative pipeline... a project that would cost $3 billion and take two [2] years to complete. If Garang was around this would have been done a long time ago and our largest oil block (block B) would be online by now.

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                      • 3 January 12:00, by Habibi

                        even if that were to happen and the south budget rises from $300 million to $550 million, you still stuck financially in a very tight spot. How can you possibly afford financing a multi billion project while your entire ’’national’’ budget is below $600 million? not just that but your people starving, money spent on war and billion stolen lmao

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                        • 3 January 12:02, by Habibi

                          your looking at a plan of not paying wages , feeding , providing services to your people etc... for a period of upto 6 years....

                          do you really think the cowboy down south is ready to commit such a suicide? lmao

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                    • 3 January 11:57, by Habibi

                      Ethiopia is not stupid to import all of its oil from 1 country, putting it in a tight spot while being already locked geographically.

                      but even if any of this ’’ever’’ becomes a reality, by the time it happens the north wouldve moved on.

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                      • 3 January 12:14, by Khent

                        Habibi

                        If South Sudan was entirely dependent on Ethiopia for $2.8 billion in revenue, there is no reason why Addis Ababa would believe that those morons in Juba could exercise any power over them; Ethiopia would still have virtually all the cards and would benefit from sourcing oil nearby - probably at a discount.

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                        • 3 January 12:18, by Habibi

                          South Sudan would not be dependent 100% on Ethiopia cuz there would still be a pipeline that connects to the North incase something nasty happens. Unless the low IQ GOSS decides to blow up the pipes to the north in an act of celebration, never underestimate the stupidity of south sudanese

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                          • 3 January 12:22, by Habibi

                            btw where has construction reached? cuz your article is from feb last year and if its complete, how much is actually given to ethiopia?

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                          • 3 January 12:27, by Khent

                            Habibi

                            The North is charging fees 10× in excess of the international rate, so being 100% dependent on Ethiopia seems more attractive, especially considering that they don’t occupy any of our territories. Even if Juba were only able to make half of the $2.8 billion in oil exports to Ethiopia, it would be preferable to the current situation.

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                            • 3 January 12:30, by Habibi

                              Right, good luck with fulfilling the dreams and keep us updated on where construction has reached in the midst of your civil war

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                              • 3 January 13:09, by Khent

                                Habibi

                                The rebels don’t control much of anything right now; the rebels are no longer able to threaten the bellends in Juba and so I think the war will end this year. I just hope that Juba works with Ethiopia for economically and politically mutually beneficial ends, as their agreements would suggest.

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                                • 3 January 14:03, by Habibi

                                  who you fooling, we hear about deaths and fighting across south sudan everyday

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                                  • 3 January 14:30, by Khent

                                    Habibi

                                    The rebels have lost all their headquarters and no longer control any towns or ’cities’ in the country. There are still hit and run incidents that will continue as long as Juba and the rebels fail to adhere to a permanent ceasefire. Bandits have also taken advantage of the situation...

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                                    • 3 January 14:41, by Khent

                                      ..criminals from pastoralist tribes need to be dealt with but Juba folds its arms and watches on when they should have disarmed all of them; the message should have been as follows... behave or be put in a grave; the crimes of these cattle-rustlers cannot be tolerated and this is precisely why I would have deployed a well armed 100, 000 strong police force.

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  • 3 January 07:41, by Guko Gumi

    really Habib? that is quite shallow of you my friend. you dont know what such political prostitution will bring upon Sudan.

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    • 3 January 09:03, by Khent

      South Sudan should just focus on meeting Ethiopia’s $2.8 billion dollars worth of imports in refined petroleum products and rescind on all current economic arrangements with Khartoum once the refinery has been built and the South Sudan-Ethiopia road link has been completed. The $50 billion debt that Khartoum incurred is their cross to bear alone...

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      • 3 January 09:07, by Khent

        ..so if Salva Kiir moves to split that debt, then he will be removed and provided with the treatment that all *traitors* deserve - death.

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    • 3 January 11:27, by Habibi

      prostitution? sorry to burst your bubble but there isn’t really much that south sudan, a country with a $300 million annual budget and an economy smaller then that of somalia can really do to Sudan. you can keep dreaming of a multi billion pipeline thats never gonna take place since most your budget is spent on war and is stolen anyway lmfao

      I would worry on feeding your starving population

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      • 3 January 11:30, by Habibi

        Khent, you do realise that your country only maintains a fraction of its oil income? technically 40% of it goes to the north in fees, 20-30 goes to oil companies and the leftovers go to GOSS. those leftovers spent on war while your people starving and don’t get e started on the price per barrel that collapsed to $60 from $110 in 2014

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        • 3 January 11:37, by Habibi

          South Sudan just recently was unable to afford processing passports for its own citizens, yet we got a dinka threathening the north with a multi billion pipeline LMFAO. it is sad that south sudanese would pay their lives just to hurt the north.

          anyway, by the time that south sudan gets its acts together ( not soon) and builds a respectable budget, the north wouldve stepped to the next level

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          • 3 January 11:50, by Habibi

            and lol if the $50 billion debt isn’t written off, it will be divided between the 2 states as signed by your own GOSS in 2012

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            • 3 January 12:06, by Khent

              Habibi

              We will not be paying your debt, regardless of what that death-deserving traitor promised you; if Salva Kiir actually takes on even a billion of that debt... the traitor will be removed and put down like a sick animal. The only reason he’s still able to cling on is because two Dinka sections (out of 25) are protecting him...

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              • 3 January 12:09, by Khent

                ..and so if he actually did something as unforgivable as that, the protection would be removed and all the Dinka sections would be eager to overthrow him. Salva Kiir is a brain-dead hick but even he knows what’s good for him.

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              • 3 January 12:11, by Habibi

                honestly, making you guys pay some of the debt will be just as easy as making you guys pay $26 per barrel. South Sudan population is uneducated with low literacy rates. You don’t have effective negotiation skills and as a result, anything can happen lmao

                whether its dinka or nuer, its all south sudanese. Anyway this is not a priority right now.

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                • 3 January 12:19, by Khent

                  Habibi

                  The entire population does not need to negotiate anything. You only need a small handful of people to represent the government. The thieves in Juba were told by South Sudanese outside the ’government’ to construct the alternative pipeline years before the referendum but they ignored it, so the issue does not lie with them...

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                  • 3 January 12:27, by Habibi

                    where do those small handful people originate from? your population...do you think your GOSS will employ people from western universities or their fellow tribesmen?

                    just like those handul of people employed during the 2012 negotiations, the new ones will be treated the same. a few bucks to the side and its deal. if GOSS can steal $4 billion from the poorest countries in the world,expect anything

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                    • 3 January 12:28, by Habibi

                      one of the poorest countries*

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                    • 3 January 12:38, by Khent

                      Habibi

                      Even if Juba were to only make use of educated people from say the Dinka, that would actually be a step up to what they’re doing right now. They don’t need to be at Garang’s level to negotiate with Khartoum; in fact, there’s no reason to negotiate with Khartoum on any matter at the moment in light of current dynamics...

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                      • 3 January 12:42, by Habibi

                        of course did you think there was? you were planning to negotiate with khartoum while more than halve your people live on UN handouts?

                        just keep paying the bills then we good

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                        • 3 January 12:43, by Habibi

                          BTW isn’t your government alread doinated by so called educated Dinkas? well look where that took south sudan lol, very succesful story

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                          • 3 January 12:57, by Khent

                            Habibi

                            The educated people (Garang’s circle) were all removed after Garang’s death and replaced with these death-deserving retards. The North is also led by (Islamofascist) retards, but they’re smarter by comparison. Garang’s death has given the North advantages it would not otherwise enjoy if that man was still around.

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                      • 3 January 12:48, by Khent

                        ..You’re still talking of people trying to hurt the North based purely on the all too reasonable refusal by people like myself to pay fees 10× more than the international rate. The North can do whatever it wants with its own resources and the South can do the same and Ethiopia is the more beneficial option. The traitors in Juba don’t have long.

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                        • 3 January 14:01, by Habibi

                          keep dreaming and if garang was alive south sudan wouldn’t even be independent and it wouldve saved south sudanese a lot of crisis and hunger that it is experiencing by being independent today. South Sudanese now are 10 times poorer then when they were part of Sudan. South Sudan is now in a worse state than Somalia

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                          • 3 January 14:13, by Khent

                            Habibi

                            The South would still have seceded, with or without Garang; South Sudan is poorer now than it was during the Interim Period because of this totally unnecessary war. As bad as things are now, it was worse when we lost 2 million to a government jihad. Our lands were constantly being annexed...

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                            • 3 January 14:25, by Khent

                              ..and that’s an affront worse than death. A civil war is a lot better than being subject to internal colonialization from the North. We can recover from this, but unity would have condemned us to a never ending struggle to preserve our lands in a united Sudan...losing another 2 million in the process.

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                              • 3 January 16:10, by Habibi

                                I think it is very visible to the world right now that the whole civil war was there due to south sudanese rebelion. as you can see for yourself, the same reasons you complained about being part of the north is happening in your coutnry right now. you put yourself and us into a 50 year civil, the longest in africa and this war was there even before islamists got to power in Sudan

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                                • 3 January 16:12, by Habibi

                                  The issue is not the North, it is the South. You guys just cannot stop fighting. You are there right now killing each other based on tribes. South Sudan existed for 7 years, you spent about 5 year of those fighting each other. It got to the point that you are now poorer then even Somalia. whereas we all know how the North is doing

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                                  • 3 January 16:15, by Habibi

                                    what even more money is that as soon as you gained independence, $4 billion was stolen by your own leader. You are now enduring hyperinflation, starvation , diseases , refugees hitting 2 million etc... yet you here saying you will get over it, you think its a game nigga which can be fixed in a day? South Sudanese just cannot stop fighting, lack of education is the reason

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                                    • 3 January 16:18, by Habibi

                                      and that won’t be fixed anytime soon as your future generations, your kids, are not in education today. 2 million refugees already most are children out of school. these kids will hold hate towards whoever is responsible for this disaster and will hold arms sooner or later.

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                                      • 3 January 16:41, by Khent

                                        Habibi

                                        The problem with you people is that you pretend that you did nothing wrong against the South even as you annexed Nation size territories from us as soon as Britain departed. I’m not going be lectured by you or any other northerner, because Sudan has been a failed State since independence...

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                                        • 3 January 16:46, by Khent

                                          ..and has also subjected certain citizens to ethnic-cleansing; according to the UN and other international bodies... the war in Darfur consumed the lives of half a million people. You believe your Islamofascist ’government’ and maintain that the figure is actually 10, 000. Europeans, Asians and even other Africans can lecture us, but not you...

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                                          • 3 January 16:51, by Khent

                                            ..Our war erupted in December of 2013, and so prior to that it was the North that was subject to more civilian deaths during the entire period of the Interim Period. Sudan has been in existence since 1956 so your boasts about the State of your economy are just ridiculous.

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                                            • 3 January 16:58, by Khent

                                              ..Sudan is also recognised as one of the most corrupt countries in the world, and this is annealed by every yearly release of the Index. Sudan also spends an inordinate amount on wars, the military and the security sectors. 80% of the budget is dedicated to this, and Juba is doing the same thing...

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                                              • 3 January 17:05, by Khent

                                                ..Wars have a profoundly negative affect on the economy, and this is precisely why South Sudan and Syria are in the state they’re in; Juba’s budget has been reduced to only $300 million due to the war, low oil prices and that ludicrous agreement they signed with Khartoum. Somalia has a budget of $150 million, but it’s not experiencing war at the moment, so its population is not as disrupted...

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                                                • 3 January 17:14, by Khent

                                                  ..South Sudan is not even a country at the moment; this is exactly what happens when your mastermind dies and all your educated leaders are removed or sidelined by aggressive, illiterate and corrupt ’politicians’ and generals. This war will end, and we’ll be left scarred and broken, but at least we don’t parrot the official government lines

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                                                  • 3 January 17:26, by Khent

                                                    ..Kiir has virtually no support left and will not be allowed to occupy that position for almost 30 years; we didn’t accept the despots in Khartoum and we won’t accept them in Juba. I remember how excited you were when Ebola broke out because you thought that it may reach the South. Every Nation has difficult beginnings but we’ll embrace the good and the bad in our self-agency...

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                                                    • 3 January 17:40, by Khent

                                                      ..And can learn from this and seek out examples to follow from all over the world. The task is daunting but it’s better than being subject to Jihad for decades and having territories larger than Lebanon constantly being annexed. The healing process will take a considerable period of time and effort...

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                                                      • 3 January 17:45, by Khent

                                                        ..and I take comfort in the fact that it’s not final like the reservation status we were in store for if we allowed ourselves to be lorded over by you.

                                                        PS: What you said about future embittered children also applies to you based on your wars in Darfur, Kordofan and Blue Nile. Like I said, you’re North Sudanese, you can’t lecture anyone.

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                                                        • 3 January 19:57, by Habibi

                                                          your lecturing comments amuse me because you are south sudanese, a native of supposedly the country with the lowets literacy rate in the world, LMFAO. nigga, the only reason Sudan has ever been in crisis was because you sub humans were part of us. It is very clear that you guys lack education and knowledge which shows why you resort to fake numbers to support yourselfes

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                                                          • 3 January 20:00, by Habibi

                                                            So called Sudan, which you call a faild state, has the 6th largest economy in Africa. the 5h strongest air force, some of the highest literacy rates in the continent. 14th highest per capita income out of 54 in Africa. 3rd largest in landmass and some of the most industrially advanced in Africa.... whereas your country is competing with Somalia....

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                                                            • 3 January 20:02, by Habibi

                                                              you use fake Darfur figures of 300,000 whereas you guys already lost 100,000 in the first 4 years of war. A pretty sure that I schooled you last time we argued that divided by population, you lost more people per capita wise. Don’t even get me started on the fact that Darfur, realistically, only lost 10,000 in fighting....

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                                                              • 3 January 20:04, by Habibi

                                                                And Somalia budget is not $150, it is $278 million. thank you for agreeing that you are a failure, and yes your country has a budget of only $300 million because it is a joke of a country. An example to other regions in Africa to not secede from their motherland to hurt their previous countrymen. The hell that is happening in south sudan cannot be compared to anywhere else in Africa

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                                                                • 3 January 20:07, by Habibi

                                                                  South Sudan is a country of uneducated and dumb people. things are so bad that you blame the collapse of your banana state on the death of 1 person. South Sudan has a literacy rate of below 35%, I even wonder whether those people who voted in the referendum know which box they actually ticked...

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                                                                  • 3 January 20:09, by Habibi

                                                                    and lol at Blue Nile , south kordofan and darfur.... it sounds like your mind is stuck in 2012 because those battles were long over and finished. we never hear of SPLM/N or other rebels anymore. they are finished militarily, politically and economically and even museveni, who was their main secret funder has become an ally to Khartoum

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                                                                    • 3 January 20:11, by Habibi

                                                                      The war , I wouldn’t even call it a war, in BN , SK and Darfur were just small pocket rebellion of groups that don;t represent the people. it cannot be compared to the collapse of your joke of a country south sudan. we are talking 2 million uneducated refugees just in neighbouring countries alone... that you comparing your budget to somalia alone is a joke in itself lmfao

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                                                                      • 3 January 20:14, by Habibi

                                                                        and lol, a person from a country whos entire GDP is at $3 BN telling me, whos countries GDP is at over $110 billion that my country is a failed state is hilarious hhhhhh If Sudan is really a failed state then 50 out of 54 african states are failed states too..... now please go play catch up with somalia and its music to my ears hearing your joke of a country burning down

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                                                                        • 3 January 20:19, by Habibi

                                                                          you were promised a paradise as soon as you secede from the north with only £3.5 BN in oil revenues annually. taught that all your problems in the world are a result of the north. such propaganda can only be spread to extremely uneducated populations, which south sudanese are...

                                                                          well the north has the last laugh today... where is israel when you need them LMFAO hhhh

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                                                                          • 4 January 00:35, by Khent

                                                                            Habibi

                                                                            The Arabs have taught you well in their ways of inversion; it’s funny how you just ignore the fact that your people started all of this by annexing Southern territory. You lost more people in Darfur but you try to avoid this by ignoring the half a million figure and instead settle on 300, 000.

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                                                                            • 4 January 00:50, by Khent

                                                                              Sudan has been indepedent for almost 70 years and you’re proud of your economic development since that time? It’s funny that Islamist terrorists start wars with people by raiding people, annexing lands and committing massacres, but it’s the people resisting that are in the wrong. LOL!

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                                                                              • 4 January 01:04, by Khent

                                                                                Sudan is not the motherland, it’s just a terror supporting State with an identity problem. The civil war is better than being governed by Aloha snack barring terrorists that kill millions and annex territories. Muslims always start conflicts and then blame the ’infidels’ for fighting back. Whether it’s the crusades or East Timor or the Balkans... it’s always the same...

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                                                                                • 4 January 01:10, by Khent

                                                                                  Yeah, South Sudan has a low literacy rate but how long have we been indepedent? You have a rate that is just 2x over that and you’ve been a country since 1956. LOL! The numbers from the UN are apparently fake but Bashir’s figures are genuine? ROFL!

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                                                                                  • 4 January 01:26, by Khent

                                                                                    Israel has been defeating over 200 million Arabs since 1948, so I don’t know why you’re even bringing them up. LOL! The Israelis were useful during our struggle against State Jihad, so we have history that we’ll build upon once this war is over.

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                                                                                      • 4 January 01:42, by Khent

                                                                                        I suppose 58% is respectable, I mean you’ve only been a country for 68 years. ROFL! And all your boasts about being this and that in Africa is laughable; it’s like being the tallest kid in kindergarten. All that time and you’re boasting. LOL!

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                                                                                        • 4 January 02:07, by Khent

                                                                                          Britain gave Sudan a degree of autonomy during the colonial period and Sudan is now officially 61 years old, so far too much has passed for you to be proud of your current situation economically or otherwise.

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                                                                                          • 4 January 02:38, by Khent

                                                                                            ..And if you consider the years of the Mahdi and the period just prior to official indepedence, that adds years more to when Sudan was independent. A literacy rate of 58% is nothing to gloat about when all these years are considered.

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                                                                                            • 4 January 02:49, by Khent

                                                                                              Juba could have done far more considering that it was basically independent since 2005. A literacy rate of 32% is pitiful but so is 58%. But hey, Bashir and his government are believable so carry on.

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                                                                                              • 4 January 14:02, by Habibi

                                                                                                6. Are you mentally ill or are you actually adding the Mahdi years to years in which Sudan was independent? cuz if that was the case then you might as well say Ghana is a thousand years old LMFAO what a joke coming from an idiot south sudanese, a country below somalia in everything LMFAO

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                                                                                              • 4 January 14:06, by Habibi

                                                                                                7. As usual, fake figures to save your black ass hhhhh. 58% literacy? was that figure from 2005 when you charcoal barbarians were part of us lol?

                                                                                                Sudan lieracy rate as of 2017 was %75.9 while you failures have a literacy of %27 LMFAO, even that %35 figure appears to be to nice for you failures lmao , how the hell did the referendum even take place with such uneducated population hhhhhh

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                                                                                    • 4 January 14:00, by Habibi

                                                                                      5. The reason I bring them up is because you charcoal negros been holding their flag on independence day, where are they now while you are going through these crisis? oh yea they don’t give a shit about you idiots hhhhhh

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                                                                                  • 4 January 13:58, by Habibi

                                                                                    4.hhhh as usual blaming us for your misery... have you guys given us any time to educate your butts? you were fighting for 50 years just to create a failure of a country called south sudan today.... who you fooling? there is no excuse for being that dumb and illiterate in 2018! if your government actually spent money in education the SPLM/N maybe you would be 40% literate hhhh

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                                                                                • 4 January 13:55, by Habibi

                                                                                  3. Of course, blame the muslims and arabs as usual for your own shit. I bet in a few days you will blame us again when a Nuer fucks up a dinka down in the Jungle. LMFAO, its went to the level that you negros rank below Somalia in literally every modern ranking, how much more shame can there be?

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  • 4 January 13:50, by Habibi

    1. We didn;t annex any of your lands, all the lands are northern territory. AND lmao on the half a million figure, even Sudans worst enemy propaganda , ICC and HRW never mention such an inflated figure..... only your charcoal ass that comes from the most uneducated country comes up with figures out his ass lmao, only 10,000 died in Darfur

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    • 4 January 13:52, by Habibi

      2. LOL do you know why Sudan never advanced economically until recebtly in its 62 yeas of existence? because you dumb negro uneducated creatures never put your weapons down.... even after independence, you negroes stil killing each other in the bushes like animals. 2 million refugees in jusr 4 years and 100,000 dead already? what a failure

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  • 4 January 14:09, by Habibi

    Bottom line of the story, there is no way through it. South Sudan is a failure that ranks below Somalia in everything. The charcoal niggers down south fought a 50 year war just to get into even more misery. I even dispute that referendum with the fact that over %74 of south sudanese don’t know how to read or write.... do they even know which box they ticked? LMFAO

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  • 4 January 14:27, by Habibi

    Hey man,
    I take back all the racist comments such as the charcoal one. I realised that I have stepped very much out of the line. That is not the way I was raised within my family. I still believe south sudan was a mistake, but I take back all racist references. I apologize and I think it was just due to the heat of the moment.

    You win this debate, stop blaming Khartoum for everything, please

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    • 4 January 15:34, by Khent

      Habibi

      Don’t worry about it, bro... I realise that you were just playing a character in a heated debate. I have no doubt that you weren’t raised like that, because our mothers (North & South) are women of dignity and strength. I must also apologise for my insensitive remarks on your religion. Have a good day/night... wherever you are in this world.

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      • 5 January 13:12, by Khent

        I’ll add a more detailed response to your claims when I get the time because I will not tolerate anyone slandering my people. I’ve been very civil and will remain civil but I will drop my restraint when ahistorical claims are presented as fact.

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      • 5 January 18:07, by Habibi

        Thanks for acceping my apology and I also forgive you for the remarks regarding islam.We are humans and humans make mistakes.we hold different beliefs, but all human beings deserve the same respect regardless of the way god almighty created us. We may never agree on the past, but we can easily shape the future.

        lol some of your comments were funny though in a good way like about infidels hhhh

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        • 7 January 16:49, by Khent

          Habibi

          I appreciate you initiating the resetting of our debates and for your acceptance of my apology. It takes a lot of maturity and courage and speaks volumes of your upbringing. Respect, mate. The charcoal comments made me laugh because even I call Southerners midnight personified. ROFL!

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          • 7 January 17:02, by Khent

            Before formal independence, there was a successful push for "self-governance" in 1950 and it came into effect at the end of 1951, but it was limited, so that’s a bit of a facile argument on my part as Sudan was not truly independent at that stage, so I’ll take that back.

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            • 7 January 17:03, by Khent

              I really don’t know why you think I blame Khartoum for everything when I’ve consistently blamed Juba for every failure in the South during the entire Interim Period; I hold Juba solely responsible for the lawlessness, the complete lack of development, the endemic corruption, incompetence, nepotism and for sparking an unnecessary war in December of 2013. I don’t blame Khartoum for any of that.

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              • 7 January 17:04, by Khent

                I only blame successive Khartoum governments for annexing Southern territories at the heels of Britain’s departure in 1956; areas like Gulli were annexed in 1956 by Khartoum. The border between Upper Nile State and White Nile has been pushed 90km southwards since independence. Kafia Kingi was annexed from the South in 1960 by Ibrahim Abboud. Kafia Kingi is larger than Lebanon.

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                • 7 January 17:14, by Khent

                  The Kafia Kingi enclave was part of Bahr al-Ghazal province when Sudan gained independence in 1956. In 1960 it was transferred to Darfur, which had become a province of Sudan in 1916. (The Kafia Kingi Enclave: People, Politics and History in the North-south Boundary Zone of Western Sudan – Edward Thomas)

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                  • 7 January 17:23, by Khent

                    The literacy rate in South Sudan stands at 32% - a mere increase of 19% since 2008. If the murderous thieves in Juba were not so insistent on corruption, nepotism, mismanagement and internecine civil wars, the literacy rate could have been brought above 70% during the Interim Period. The death-deserving cretins in Juba stole at least $18 billion since 2005.

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                    • 7 January 17:28, by Khent

                      As for my sources on Sudan’s literacy rate, I cited figures from the IMF website that you made use of, and the percentage is apparently from 2015.

                      https://knoema.com/atlas/Sudan/topics/Education/Literacy/Adult-literacy-rate

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                      • 7 January 17:30, by Khent

                        ..The website is most likely wrong, and Sudan could have a literacy rate of 75%, but that’s just a little over 2x the literacy rate of the South for a country that’s been around for 8x as long. Now, a lot of Southerners were educated in the North, so it’s not as if the South reached 32% in a vacuum starting in 2011.

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                        • 7 January 17:44, by Khent

                          A lot of Southerners might be naive to believe that Israel truly cares for them due to historical links that began in the 60s, but those of us that grew up in the West know that the world is governed by Realpolitik. There are no friends on the grand chessboard. Nations don’t have friends - only interests...

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                          • 7 January 17:55, by Khent

                            Successive Khartoum governments have annexed a lot of Southern territory since independence, and this is confirmed by government gazettes and by historians that have studied the matter. This is currently the biggest stumbling block between the North & South. The two largest and most prominent areas are Kafia Kingi and Abyei...

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                            • 7 January 18:02, by Khent

                              The CPA prescribed 1956 as the specific date from which we would adjudicate territorial holdings between us. This date [as prescribed by the CPA] is inviolate > meaning it is not be violated. The only exception to the 1956 border is Abyei; Abyei was transferred to the North in 1905 by the British but the CPA afforded the people the right to choose their Nationality in a Referendum...

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                              • 7 January 18:09, by Khent

                                Kafia Kingi is already acknowledged as part of South Sudan by actors of international significance and is presented as such by the CIA fact-book and even Google. Abyei is a little different. Abyei is defined by the Abyei protocol and the Permanent Court of Arbitration as "the area of the nine Ngok Dinka chiefdoms transferred to Kordofan in 1905."...

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                                • 7 January 18:10, by Khent

                                  The mandate of the PCA was to was "to define (i.e. delimit) on map the boundaries of the area of the nine Ngok Dinka chiefdoms transferred to Kordofan in 1905, based on the submissions of the Parties." The PCA determined that its delimitation of the Abyei area is correspondent with the area of the nine Ngok chiefdoms transferred to Kordofan in 1905...

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                                  • 7 January 18:16, by Khent

                                    The NCP rejected the 2009 PCA ruling on Abyei in September of 2010. The Misseriya are transhumant; their traditional lands and permanent settlements are in Muglad and Babanusa; the Misseriya are merely seasonal migrants, residing in Abyei [as guests] for a derisory amount of time — four [4] months out of the year at the very most...

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                                    • 7 January 18:20, by Khent

                                      ..So the idea that they could participate in referendum to determine the fate of a land that historians, actors of international significance, esteemed international courts, recognize as belonging to the Dinka-Ngok is ridiculous on its face.

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                                      • 7 January 18:22, by Khent

                                        In 1980 President Nimeiri, the same president who had signed the autonomy agreement in 1972, made an effort through the national assembly to redraw the Upper Nile border to include the Heglig and Unity oilfields in the province of Kordofan (i.e., outside the south). (Human Rights Watch: Sudan, Oil, and Human Rights 2003)

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                                        • 7 January 18:26, by Khent

                                          I made a mistake conflating the CIJ estimates of the war in Darfur with those of the UN; the UN estimates a quarter of a million while the CIJ estimates 400, 000 dead, so I must apologise for that. The UN’s official casualty estimate for South Sudan stands at 50, 000, while others think that it may be as high as 100, 000.

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                                          • 7 January 18:27, by Khent

                                            The tragedy of 50, 000 deaths still pales in comparison to the devastation that was wrought in just one area of South Sudan in 1988-89 by Khartoum using the Rezeigat and Misseriya of the PDF; these Baggara tribes worked in tandem with Khartoum in their operations against Dinka civilians and were instrumental in creating the artificial famine of 1988-89 that resulted in 250, 000 deaths.

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                                            • 7 January 18:28, by Khent

                                              Khartoum created an artificial famine that claimed 250, 000 lives in 1988-9 and a further 100, 000 in 1998. http://www.globalpolitics.net/essays/Tom_Rhodes.pdf

                                              And this is 40x less than what we suffered during the war with Khartoum.

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                                              • 7 January 18:32, by Khent

                                                In response to the accusation that Juba started the practice of supporting rebels across the Greater Sudan border, I must tell you that Juba only supported the SPLM-N after Khartoum supported at least three [3] different rebel groups in the South prior to our response in 2011...

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                                                • 7 January 18:34, by Khent

                                                  Former rebels like the now defunct South Sudan Democratic Movement/Army (SSDM/A), the SSDM/A-Cobra faction and the South Sudan Liberation Army (SSLA) admitted that they received military assistance from Khartoum before they were integrated into the SPLA. This happened two years before wars broke out in Kordofan and Blue Nile in 2011.

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