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Sudan Tribune

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Sudanese Islamists in Khartoum demonstrate against toppling of Egypt’s Morsi

July 8, 2013, (KHARTOUM) – Dozens of Sudanese Islamists staged a demonstration in front near of the Egyptian embassy in central Khartoum to protest the ouster of Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi by the army last week.

Sudanese and Egyptian Islamists shout slogans against the ousting of Egypt's President Mohamed Mursi during a rally after midday prayers, as they march from King Farouq Mosque to the Egyptian embassy in central Khartoum July 8, 2013 (REUTERS/ Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah)
Sudanese and Egyptian Islamists shout slogans against the ousting of Egypt’s President Mohamed Mursi during a rally after midday prayers, as they march from King Farouq Mosque to the Egyptian embassy in central Khartoum July 8, 2013 (REUTERS/ Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah)
The protesters chanted slogans denouncing the intervention of the military in the government and demanded “the restoration legitimacy” during their march from King Farouq Mosque which saw tens of bystanders joining them.

The demonstration was attended by members of the Islamic Movement (IM), Islamic Constitution Front (ICF), opposition Popular Congress Party (PCP) in addition to al-Sadig Abdel-Magid who is the General Guide of the legacy Muslim Brotherhood (MB) movement in Sudan and is rarely seen in public events.

They handed a memo to the Egyptian embassy blasting the “coup” and labeling it as a “setback” to Arab Spring revolutions while calling for prosecuting army generals behind it including Defense Minister Abdel Fattah al-Sisi.

Ali Gaweesh from the Sudan MB described the army move as “criminal” that was driven by Zionist and western intelligence agencies.

The Sudanese government and the ruling National Congress Party (NCP) have avoided taking sides since Morsi’s ouster even though observers believe that the Islamist regime in Khartoum is dismayed at the army’s move against the president who hails from the Muslim Brotherhood movement.

Egypt’s military chief General al-Sisi announced Morsi’s overthrow last Wednesday, citing his inability to end a deepening political crisis, as dozens of armoured personnel carriers streamed onto Cairo’s streets.

The dramatic exit of Morsi was greeted with delight by millions of jubilant people on the streets of Cairo and other cities overnight.

Unlike most Arab leaders, the Sudanese president has yet to congratulate interim Egyptian president Adli Mansour on his new role.

(ST)