Home | News    Wednesday 15 February 2012

South Sudan’s VP declares his net worth, urges peers to do same

February 14, 2012 (JUBA) – The vice president (VP) of the Republic of South Sudan, Riek Machar, has officially declared his personal income, assets and liabilities while calling on all constitutional post holders in the country to do the same.

Riek Machar, Vice President of South Sudan (AFP)

Machar issued a public statement on Tuesday following his receipt of a certificate from the South Sudan Anti-Corruption Commission (SSACC) which commended the VP for declaring his net worth and completing the declaration form.

He provided the commission with information on his income and assets he owns around the world such as houses, lands, and vehicles and the dates he acquired them along with supporting documents.

The SSACC has sent a form to all the constitutional post holders and senior civil servants in the country on which they are required declare their net worth to the task force. It will also include employees working in non-governmental organisations.

The disclosure must also include income and assets for spouses and children as well and is to be filed every year.

Machar encouraged all officials to be transparent in order to "clear doubts and flying accusations" and make South Sudan free from corruption, adding that this will give credibility to individuals and the country.

The VP’s declaration form was received by the chairperson of the SSACC Judge John Gatwech Lul, in the presence of his deputy, Johnny Saverio Ayik.

Lul commended the political will and the lead taken by the President and the VP to help the commission fight corruption in the nation which came to existence in July 2011.

He urged the constitutional post holders and senior civil servants to cooperate and complete the declaration form before the given deadline of 31st March.

The officials also briefed the VP on their recent engagement with experts from a number of countries during their trips abroad to mobilise support.

The commission’s chairman revealed that a number of key nations through their financial institutions such as the Swiss Bank have already agreed to coordinate efforts aimed at tracing stolen money.

He said that they have also invited experts from US and Austria to help the commission devise ways to go after any money embezzled and funnelled into foreign bank accounts.

(ST)