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CRA elected president asks Sudan support to restore stability

March 29, 2016 (KHARTOUM) - The newly elected Central African Republic (CAR)’s President Faustin Archange Touadéra, was in a visit to Khartoum where he demanded Sudan to support his effort to bring peace and stability in the neighbouring country.

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Sudanese President Omer al-Bashir greets CAR elected President Faustin Archange Touadéra in Khartoum on 27 March 2016 (Photo SUNA)

Touadéra who was elected on February 14, will take office on 30 March. He will replace a transitional government that has been facing sectarian violence during the last two years.

The would be president who arrived to Khartoum on a Sudanese government aircraft on Sunday held talks on security matters with President al-Bashir on the same day.

"Al-Bashir reiterated that CAR’s security and stability are part of Sudan’s peace and stability," said Sudanese Foreign Minister Ibrahim Ghandour in statements to the official SUNA following the meeting.

Ghandour added that Sudan vowed to support the new elected president in his efforts to bring stability.

He added that Tauadéra decided to visit Sudan before swearing-in because the two neighbouring states are linked by security and political agreements.

Ghandour further said that the elected president referred to the tripartite agreement and demanded Sudan support to bring peace and stability in his country.

The foreign minister was referring to a security agreement signed by the two countries and Chad in December 2004 providing to exchange information and to form joint border patrols.

The CAR suffered the worst crisis in its history since late 2012 when mainly Muslim Seleka rebels toppled the government of François Bozizé. Christian militias so-called anti-Balaka groups responded by attacking the Muslim minority. A fifth of the population have fled their homes to escape the violence.

In a statement released on Tuesday, Human rights Watch (HRW) urged Touadéra to make security and justice for serious human rights abuses priorities for his government.

“The new government needs to act quickly, with support from the international community, to protect civilians and stop ongoing abuses,” said Lewis Mudge, Africa researcher at Human Rights Watch. “Reducing tensions, working on justice and reconciliation, and protecting civilians from further attacks and violence should be the first priority.”

Before to visit Khartoum, Tauadéra was in Malabo capital of Equatorial Guinea, Ndjamena and Brazzaville.

(ST)